Resolve

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Lifestyle and Wedding photographer Karen Hill (based in New York City) fills a unique niche by bringing an angle of fine art to portraiture and event photography. Her photos are absolutely stunning, elegant, and classic – much like her website design. We thought her site would be perfect to showcase this week and we can’t wait for you to see it!

Read on to hear what she had to say about her site’s creation and the great advice she has for people getting started on creating their websites. Don’t forget to see more of her gorgeous site and photos at www.karenhill.com!

Karen Hill

Q: How would you describe the aesthetic of your website in three words?

KH: Classic, Elegant, Timeless, and Modern (I came up with four.)

Karen Hill

Q: How do you choose the photos that you display on your homepage?

KH: I chose a recent image that I think best represents my work overall. For the portfolio page, I chose to do a grid to highlight each portfolio. I love how this page turned out. Hopefully it will intrigue prospective clients, wedding planners, and editors to click to see more!

Karen Hill

Q: How often do you update your website?

KH: I update my website a few times a year as I have new work I want to share. I find keeping my website fresh is very important to me, as well as to my potential clients as my work is ever evolving. We often spend time looking at my site together and talking about their wedding and their favorite images. This gives me a lovely window into their sensibilities and helps me to plan the photography timeline with them.

Karen Hill

Since I use a bunch of different cameras, both digital and traditional film, I like to hear which images speak to them the most so that I can talk about the different cameras I use to prepare our shoot. For instance, two very distinctive cameras I use are the Holga and the Widelux. These are very specialized cameras that do one thing. The Holga is a plastic camera and has a square, very ethereal look to it while the Widelux is an extra wide panoramic. The Widelux is great for overviews and dramatic shots, but it’s not a formal portrait camera. So for instance if a client doesn’t love the Holga’s ethereal, somewhat blurry look, I know to focus on a different camera like the Rollei or the Hasselblad, which are also square format cameras. But the Widelux is one of those cameras that everybody seems to love.

Karen Hill

I also point out that the Holga and the Widelux are not my main cameras but that I shoot a roll or two throughout the day. My main cameras are the Contax 645 and the Canon 5D Mark III. Clients often want to distinguish between digital and traditional film images, so it’s helpful for this. In the end they are engaging me to make beautiful photographs that reflect their day but I do love having a conversation with them as well, I think it gets couples excited about the photography. I truly love to think that the photography just “happens.” That feels so romantic to me and to some degree it’s true; but weddings and portrait sessions take on a personality and energy all their own. It’s important to key into this essential element but to also keep in mind the images your client has engaged you to capture. I spend a good amount of time planning each shoot to develop the photography timeline and make sure all of the requested images are in the timeline. This collaboration is key for me and my website really helps get the conversation going. In January, when the studio is a little slower, I usually refresh the whole site to reflect what’s new and what’s relevant now. This year, that meant a whole new look for us. Prospective clients, wedding planners, and editors seem to love how it turned out!

Karen Hill

Q: What is your favorite feature that liveBooks offers?

KH: My favorite feature is the editSuite. It allows me behind-the-scenes access, so to speak, and be in charge of image placement and image updates. I love this feature so much! Secondly, working with one of liveBooks’ web designers, Ryan. He gets it. This was our second redesign that we’ve worked on together and he’s awesome. And finally, SEO, keywording, and stats.

Karen Hill

Q: What’s one piece of advice you’d offer to someone designing their website?

KH: Just do it, the rest will follow. It’s definitely a labor of love that is your most important business tool and should feature your very best and brightest work at all times.

Karen Hill

Have a website you’d like us to feature? Email us at social@livebooks.com!

January 21st, 2016

Photography Resolutions for 2016

Posted by Heather

We can’t believe that the first month of 2016 is already more than halfway over – is it just us or does time go faster each year?! Since now is the time to take inventory over the past year and make changes for the new one, we thought we’d get into the spirit by sharing our top photography resolutions for 2016.

Ask Others for Feedback

It can be scary and daunting to put yourself out there and ask others for feedback on your work – especially something as close to your heart as your craft. However, asking a trusted source to critique your work will allow you to see things from a new perspective and open your eyes to new ways of doing something, ultimately allowing you to hone your art. Some questions to have people think about when viewing your photos: What do you like? What don’t you like? How does it  make you feel?

Keep a Photo Journal of Goals – And Accomplishments

Many of us keep journals for all sorts of things; this should be no different for your professional life. Take the time to write down your goals, hopes, and focuses for the year ahead. But also use your journal as a way to track your progress throughout the months and make sure to account for your accomplishments, successes, and praise yourself for goals that you achieve. Looking back at all of the things that you have worked hard on will not only keep you motivated, but it will help you hold yourself accountable for the goals you still have yet to conquer.

Try Something New – Venture Into a Different Type of Photography

Many photographers are especially drawn to one or two specific types of photography. This is great; it allows you to hone your skills all while photographing something that you really love. However, sometimes, it also allows you to become complacent and narrows your horizons over time. This year, try a completely different type of photography that you’ve never done before. Are you typically a wedding photographer? Try out sports photography! Gravitate toward landscapes and nature? Try your hand at portraiture. You never know what skills you may learn from a completely different genre that can translate into making your art even better.

Commit to the Best Gear Possible

One thing we see all the time is photographers that have beautiful, top-of-the-line cameras, yet their lenses, tripods, etc aren’t fit for the job – or vice versa. This year, make sure you budget accordingly so that your gear is fit for your job and the beautiful imagery you create. Allocate plenty of time to do research, read reviews, talk to fellow photographers, and shop around before committing to a piece of gear.

Print and Frame Your Favorite Photos

While this may seem a little silly, you (hopefully!) became a photographer because you love creating beautiful imagery. This should be for you, your friends, and family to enjoy as well! Show off your favorite and best shots around your home or office. This will also be a great way to remind yourself each time you see them why you love doing what you do and inspire you to get out there and find your next favorite shot.

Embrace Technically Imperfect Photos

And lastly, while it is so easy to be harsh and critical of your own work, sometimes the technically imperfect photos make for the most breathtaking shots. Be kind to yourself; there’s a balance to be struck between striving to be better and never thinking your work is good enough. Sometimes a little bit of motion or blur can add interesting elements to an image that you never knew would work. Don’t be afraid to experiment – you never know what you’ll find!

What are some of your photography resolutions for 2016? Sound off in the comments below – we’d love to hear what your goals are!

Guest blog post by liveBooks client Ed Asmus

“Stunning” is a word that I don’t often use. But in this particular case, my trip to visit Ethiopia’s Omo Valley was not only aesthetically stunning, but strange and otherworldly. Almost ancestral.

Ed Asmus

Ed Asmus

This magical place is also known as “The Cradle of Mankind” – home of the oldest hominid fossil, #AL288-1 or “Lucy.” 3.5 million years after her, I went to photograph and visit her descendants.

This life changing journey started in a strange way. I am a long time user of the Broncolor lighting in my professional photography business in Sacramento, CA. One day, when I was reading their monthly newsletter, I saw a featured photographer and read about his trip to Ethiopia. His images were immediately captivating. Eerie, almost. It was hard to believe that what I was looking at really still existed in the world today. I contacted Ken, the photographer, who told me that things were rapidly changing over there, that I should go for at least two weeks, and that I should go NOW. He gave me his trusted guide’s name and shoot organizer, Ayele Sode, and all the pieces began to fall into place.

 

Ed Asmus

Ed Asmus

We planned our trip in November, just after the Ethiopian rainy season – their springtime – so native flowers would be in bloom. With equipment loaded atop our SUV, we headed to our first stop to see the “Surma Tribe.” It took three long days of driving in the bush to get to their village; the dirt roads were horrible. Not many Western people get to this tribe because they are so far off the beaten path, and there are no accommodations or running water. Our guide had organized tent camping and an enormous bottled water supply. He brought with us a chef and a hired bodyguard with an AK-47. I forgot we were in the bush and a long ways away from any cell service or modern conveniences.

 

Ed Asmus

Ed Asmus

We planned to stay five days with the Surma people, but it was cut short by tribal tensions one night, so we departed a day early. We still experienced rain, which made the roads even more difficult. On our way out, some roads were washed out and we ended up getting stuck four times. It crossed my mind more than once that we were all going to spend the night in the Landcruiser. The first little town we came to is where we found pension for $2.00 a night – and I gladly picked up the tab. The rain made our travels longer as we had another three days of driving to get to our next tribe. We saw seven tribes total, each more different than the last. The one commonality is that they all live and depend on the land; most are either farmers of teff, corn, wheat, or coffee, or they free range cattle and goats. Our accommodations ranged from $2 to $120 per night/USD. This really is a National Geographic wonderland, and what you will see and experience is worth every penny. All I can say is stunning.

 

Ed Asmus

Ed Asmus

I’ve been back for only two weeks and am already missing the ET native people. They seem to get by on what they have and are happy. My plans are to go back again next year, fine tune the logistics, and shoot more beautiful work.

Ed Asmus

Ed Asmus

Ed Asmus

Please check out Ed’s website for more stunning images!

Studio: 916-455-5061

Email: edasmus@sbcglobal.net

Photographer Michel Porro takes absolutely stunning portraits that span a wide variety of genres. From musicians to actors to corporate professionals, the imagery is crisp, clean, and beautiful. We found that his website design also evokes these same elements – and couldn’t wait to feature it this week.

Read on to see what he had to say about his website’s creation, and don’t forget to check out all his photos at www.michelporro.com.

Michel Porro

Q: How would you describe the aesthetic of your website in three words?

MP: Light (bright and not “heavy”), Modern, Clean.

Michel Porro

Q: How do you choose the photos that you display on your homepage?

MP: We like to display a mix of different portrait situations in the homepage slideshow. The competition for attention is intense. Millions of visuals speak to our imagination – a good picture becomes the message. We remember only the most engaging and remarkable images. The homepage is the prime chance to deliver an “elevator pitch” in just a few seconds. It is the portal and “switch” to invite the visitor into the realm of the photographer’s creative vision. liveBooks stands out because its technical and creative developers really understand the power and value of this initial impact.

Michel Porro

Q: How often do you update your website?

MP: Not often to be honest. Four times per year and then only slight additions. I believe in stability. There is no use to constantly change. It really is about the display of a constant quality of the body of work and once the train is rolling, no need to adapt too often.

Michel Porro

Q: What is your favorite feature that liveBooks offers?

MP: The full screen view. This is awesome.

Michel Porro

Q: What’s one piece of advice you’d offer to someone designing their website?

MP: This really is the most important question. The website is an invitation inside the heart of the business of the entrepreneur. The site is often a one-off chance to introduce the business. The presentation has to be convincing and inspiring at the same time. There have to be two winners; the business owner and the customer. Only then will there be a fruitful cooperation between the two.

Therefore, the design and the construction of the website have to be fully in line with the philosophy of the business. The business owner has to be well aware of his/her strengths and his/her medium to long term goals and purpose in professional and personal life. This really is key. A photographer, for example, needs to be able to define his/her goals and pinpoint why it is that he/she has chosen this profession (other than paying the bills and being creative, etc.)

The design and the look and feel of a website is the result from this internal investigation and discussion. It will be much easier to work with a designer of the website if the photographer has a more clear vision and knows why he/she has actually chosen this profession. They will then be able to more specifically choose a targeted client base and the style that supports reaching out to this market segment.

Usually a younger photographer hasn’t really worked this all out. Some experienced pro’s neither, for that matter. Still, I encourage both photographers and the designers of their websites to really think and talk about the underlying purpose in an early stage of their career. I believe the involvement in this process by designers can be upped a bit. Designers are trained to design and not so much to have a serious discussion about the purpose of their client’s life. I understand that. Still, these discussions will help both the designer and the client to create the best possible product that will help the client reach their goals.

It can be easily implemented in the web design process by simply asking a few questions. Where would you like to be in 18 months from now? Name three clients that you’d love to have in your portfolio in six month’s time. What kind of photography would you like to do if money was not an issue? Or, do you love photography so much that you would still do it even if you weren’t getting paid for it? These questions make the client ponder about their real purpose in professional and personal life. I believe the designer has a shared responsibility to start these discussions in order to be able to best help the client.

Michel Porro

Have a website you’d like us to feature? Email us at social@livebooks.com!

Photographer Jason Paige Smith has some of the most interesting and unique images that we’ve ever seen – and we absolutely love the way he has designed his website in a clean-cut and simple way.

We couldn’t wait to feature his website this week – read on to see what he has to say about his site and head on over to www.jasonpsmithphotography.com to check out more photos.

Jason P Smith

Q: How would you describe the aesthetic of your website in three words?

JS: Clean, Simple, Modern.

Jason P Smith

Q: How do you choose the photos that you display on your homepage?

JS: That’s always a tough question. I usually look for images I think have impact visually and maybe a little bit of intrigue to them. People see photos everywhere today, so if you can put up an image that causes a viewer to pause and reflect on what’s going on in the image, whether it’s lighting or composition or both, you have a better chance of getting them to dig deeper into your site and your work. I also seek out advice from trusted friends to help keep an objective view on things.

Jason P Smith

Q: How often do you update your website?

JS: I try to update my site with current work as often as I can. It’s important to keep putting up fresh and recent work to keep your site relevant and give people a reason to come back to it to see what you’ve been doing.

Jason P Smith

Q: What is your favorite feature that liveBooks offers?

JS: I like how easy it is to change and add new content to my site, and I like the various templates and options available when putting the site together.

Jason P Smith

Q: What’s one piece of advice you’d offer to someone designing their website?

JS: Do your homework! Look at a lot of other sites, and be sure to take note of what you like and what you don’t like on different sites you visit. And remember your site is never actually finished – it’s always a work in progress and will evolve and change just as your work does.

Jason P Smith

Have a website you’d like us to feature? Email us at social@livebooks.com!

December 10th, 2015

Behind the Lens With Matt Brown

Posted by Heather

Angels Team Photographer and liveBooks Ambassador Matt Brown takes us behind the lens to describe the technical aspects and innovative considerations that went into the creation of the top 10 photos he captures during the 2015 season.

Matt Brown

Camera Information: Nikon D4s 50 mm F/1.4 shutter speed 1/8000

“I always wanted to make a photo of Mike [Trout] taking the field smiling. It shows just how much he loves the game. Shooting it at F/1.4 adds to images and brings the focus more to Mike.” 8/2/15

Matt Brown

Camera Information: Nikon D4s 600mm F/4 shutter speed 1/2000

“I loved that Albert took over the situation and stood up for Mike after the brush up with Kansas City.” 4/12/15

Matt Brown

Camera Information: Nikon D4s 16mm F/4 shutter speed 1/250

“The Angels visit CHOC Children’s Hospital during the season. During this particular visit, Mike jumped into the red wagon. At times Mike forgets his size and that he’s not a little boy anymore.” 8/20/15

Matt Brown

Camera Information: Nikon D4 16mm F/3.5 shutter speed 1/800

“I love the fact that Collin Cowgill  never moved or looked at me as teammate Erick Aybar cleans his game glasses on his jersey. Being able to shoot from the dugout before the game brings a whole new level of access to the players.” 4/12/15

Matt Brown

Camera Information: Nikon D4s 600mm F/4 shutter speed 1/2000

“No player likes being called out on strike three. So when it happened to David Freese I captured this nice moment when he talked to the umpire about it. I like the way he’s holding his bat and being calm during the conversation.” 4/25/15

Matt Brown

Camera Information: Nikon D4 35mm F/4.5 shutter speed 1/640

“During batting practice, Albert hits in the group that takes the cages during the visitors’ warmup. So when he and Miguel Cabrera started talking about hitting I knew I wanted to capture the two of them together. Two of the best players to play baseball is always a good catch.” 5/28/15

Matt Brown

Camera Information: Nikon D4s 400mm F/4 shutter speed 1/2000

“I love the loneliness of this photo. Clean walls and dark shadows. I know everyone has seen the shot of Mike climbing the wall to make the catch against Seattle. It’s great, but I like this type of image more because it won the game for us in Oakland. It’s all Mike, no ads, no TV cameras in the background. Just Mike doing what he does best.” 4/30/15

Matt Brown

Camera Information: Nikon D4s 240mm F/4 shutter speed 1/400

“The veteran David Freese shares a cute moment with rookie Taylor Featherston before taking the field. Being the rookie can be tough on a baseball team.” 5/27/15

Matt Brown

Camera Information: Nikon D4s 24mm F/5.6 shutter speed 1/800

“Angels bench coach Dino Ebel is always getting picked on by Albert and Erick. It happens more on the road. I captured poor Dino being swung in the air during batting practice in Oakland.” 4/28/15

Matt Brown

Camera Information: Nikon D4s 70mm F/2.8 shutter speed 1/2500

“Over the last couple of years, the players have become very good at nailing their teammates during post-game interviews. In this photo, Hector Santiago sneaked up on Kole Calhoun and blasted him with a head shot of Bodyarmor. I love the spray and form created in the image.” 7/28/15

To read the original article, go here.

As 2015 comes to a close (we can’t believe it, either!) we are looking ahead to the new year. Website design trends change rapidly in this day and age – so we wanted to get a head start on what will be popular in 2016. Check out our list below and feel free to leave your predictions for trends in the comments!

Responsive Design

We know, we know – this is nothing new. But we think it’s important to reiterate that with the rise in mobile devices/tablets to conduct Internet searches, responsive design isn’t going anywhere anytime soon. In fact, mobile Internet traffic has now overtaken desktop traffic. Many businesses used to have to maintain two separate websites (one for desktop and one that was mobile-friendly) however, with responsive design and the use of HTML5, your website will automatically scale to fit the size of the device someone is using to browse. liveBooks’ new platform – liveBooks8 – is built entirely on HTML5 and allows you to easily preview what your website will look like on any type of device.

liveBooks8 allows you to preview what your website will look like on desktop, tablet, and mobile devices.

Unique Usage of Image Galleries and Layouts

With many website design companies offering templates to create your website, it is easy to feel as though your site is “cookie-cutter.” The good news is that 2016 will see a rise in unique website layouts and usage of galleries (and liveBooks8 has some pretty cool options for customizations!) that will allow you to tailor your website to completely fit your business. Plus, these new options for unique layouts will give the user an entirely original experience when browsing your site – automatically making it more memorable.

Focus on Typography

Google Fonts has made finding a font to fit your business readily accessible (and free!) – and expect a lot more emphasis on font styles, sizes, and weighting in 2016. Customizing the typography used on your website not only allows you to make those templates your own, but can add a ton of value to how users and potential clients perceive your website and business. With the new liveBooks8 platform, you will have access to Google Fonts directly in the edit screen.

Full-Bleed Photos and “Hero” Images

With the updates in technology and the fact that most websites can now support high-resolution photos without compromising load time, full-bleed images that span the entire screen and hero images will conttinue to be a trend in 2016. The idea is that these large, high-quality images grab the user’s attention as soon as they hit the site – and by choosing the images on the homepage you can direct your audience’s attention to the things that are most important about your business.

Social Media Integration

Just like responsive design, the integration of social media into your website is not a new trend. However, in 2016 and beyond it will be almost imperative that all websites have a way for users to engage on social media. Having your social icons (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc) on every page of your website will give your audience more ways to keep consuming your work in different types of settings. Allowing for a “Pin It” button on your images will make it incredibly easy for potential clients to get your photos on their Pinterest boards. Bonus: the “pin It” button will automatically link directly back to your website when someone clicks on one of your images on Pinterest.

What are your predictions for design trends in 2016? Are you making any new updates or refreshes on your website? We’d love to hear about them!

Norway-based freelance photographer Trond Teigen specializes in news, sports, and adventure – with a passion for the outdoors and the extreme. His website clearly showcases this passion and the imagery is absolutely stunning.

We think you’ll love our featured website this week – and don’t forget to head on over to www.trondteigen.com to see even more amazing photos!

Trond Teigen

Q: How would you describe the aesthetic of your website in three words?

TT: Simplistic, Stylish, Clean.

Trond Teigen 1

Q: How do you choose the photos that you display on your homepage?

TT: The hardest thing about having a portfolio is choosing what to put in it! But I tend to go for photos that have a lot of contrast and a lot of things happening in them. But still, it’s always hard to pick which ones go up and which ones don’t.

Trond Teigen 2

Q: How often do you update your website?

TT: Not often enough! But every other month or so.

Trond Teigen 3

Q: What is your favorite feature that liveBooks offers?

TT: I love the fact that nothing is local, it’s all cloud-based. And I can access and edit my liveBooks site from anywhere in the world. The editSuite is nice and simple and easy to understand and the pre-designs are great!

Trond Teigen 4

Q: What’s one piece of advice you’d offer to someone designing their website?

TT: If I were to give any advice to future liveBooks users, it would be to consider the fact that most people who will be viewing your site, that are potential clients, will be viewing it on nice, big monitors, so I would opt for a Scaler site. I would aim for the simplistic and easy-on-the-eye designs (less is more). You have to capture people’s attention, and the more stuff you have on your page, and the more cluttered it is, the less likely people are to spend a lot of time on it.

Trond Teigen 5

Have a website you’d like us to feature? Email us at social@livebooks.com!

The latest in the Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series, in which Kike profiles interesting information, research, and thoughts using drones, UAVs and remotely piloted vehicles for journalism and photography. 

Drone

Shopping for a “drone-obsessed” friend, family member, or yourself? I have decided to update my article The Best Drones for Beginners that was enjoyed by thousands of readers, and think of a general guide (list is not in order of preference) to help you choose your first drone.

I recommend you read my Drones and Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Special Series before buying any aerial platforms, including:

 

1.  Byrobot Drone Fighter GX100: 2.4GHz RF two-way communication with six channels mini drone. Remove the rotor guards in expert mode to cut down on the weight and you can even do 360 flips. It has infrared transmitters and receivers on it, so if you have two or more, you can assign them to different teams. If your Drone Fighter is “hit” by an infrared shot, its LEDs flash and your controller vibrates in your hands. Get hit six times, and the game is over.

drone 1

 

2.  Sky Viper Video Drone: With a Super Tough Duraflex Body made of resilient polypropylene, it’s easy to perform easy one-tough stunts. Perform barrel rolls in mid-flight with a simple tap of the Stunt button. Experience a true bird’s eye and record 720p High Definition pictures and video. Be sure to check the Sky Rocket S670 Sky Viper Stunt Drone too.

drone 2

3.  Holy Stone RC Quadcopter Drone with HD Camera: A key 360 four-ways flip (left, right, forward, backward), continuous roll for perfection action and wonderful performance. It’s equipped with a key return and “headless security system” to prevent from losing the copter.

drone 3

4.  Cheerson CX-10 Mini RC Quadcopter: The 29mm 4CH 2.4Ghz-6-Axis Gyro LED RC Quadcopter incorporates a 6-axis design which makes the gyroscope adjustable, promoting flying stability. Flight time is up to 4-8 minutes and it includes a 3-level adjustable speed flip function.

drone 4

5.  Syma X5C Explorers 2.4G 4CH 6-Axis Gyro RC Quadcopter with HD Camera: Equipped with HD camera, it performs flips at the press of a button with 360 degree eversion. Wind resistant, the X5C can be flown indoors or outdoors for about a 7 minute flight. A 6-axis Gyro stabilization system ensures maximum stability. For an FPV version, look at the Syma X5SW WiFi FPV, working with both Android and Apple iOS mobile phones.

drone 5

Check out the rest of Kike’s drone recommendations and the full article here, and don’t forget to head on over to Amazon and iTunes to pick up a copy of his new book, So You Want to Create Maps Using Drones?

 

Photographer Stephen Guenther has been all around the world taking stunning photos and videos. We absolutely love how his images command the screen on his website and his video integration – which is why we wanted to feature his site this week.

Enjoy his commentary on his site’s creation and then head on over to www.stephenguenther.com to see more amazing work!

Stephen Guenther

Q: How would you describe the aesthetic of your website in three words?

SG: Contemporary, Clean, Inviting.

Stephen Guenther

Q: How do you choose the photos that you display on your homepage?

SG: It can be challenging. Of course every photographer has a “new” image that they are in love with, but keeping the client’s eye in mind is important. Finding the balance between a personal aesthetic and one that is marketable is also important. Using creative friends to double check your selections can be enlightening.

Stephen Guenther 3

Q: How often do you update your website?

SG: The landing page and color palette is adjusted quarterly so that regular visitors will easily notice the change, which will invite them to explore and look for other new images.

Stephen Guenther

Q: What is your favorite feature that liveBooks offers?

SG: Actually a couple features. Low learning curve was key, and recently the ability to link a Vimeo collection of videos is amazing, as many photographers move into motion work.

Stephen Guenther

Q: What’s one piece of advice you’d offer to someone designing their website?

SG: Look at a lot of other photographer’s websites. Have a strategy before you begin, remember do not just “populate” your website with images. And be willing to showcase your personal vision and to take some calculated risks in the process to help differentiate your work from others.

Stephen Guenther

Have a website you’d like us to feature? Email us at social@livebooks.com.

 

 

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